Current Foreign Retaliatory actions

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For the retaliatory tariffs most updated information (updated 12/17/2018) click the link:  https://www.trade.gov/mas/ian/tradedisputes-enforcement/retaliations/tg_ian_002094.asp

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Foreign Tariff Responses to U.S. Section 232 Steel and Aluminum Tariffs

A number of countries and U.S. trading partners have imposed or announced their intent to impose retaliatory tariffs on specific exports from the United States in response to the United States’ Section 232 tariffs on steel and aluminum imports into the United States.

To assist U.S. companies in identifying those exports impacted by retaliatory tariffs, the Department of Commerce’s Industry & Analysis unit has compiled a Retaliation Product Coverage Matrix and retaliation information.

Retaliation Product Coverage Matrix

This matrix lists the U.S. goods subject to announced foreign retaliatory measures and includes direct links for U.S. businesses to find additional detail regarding the scope of the foreign measures.

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Canada

On July 1, 2018, Canada began imposing additional tariffs of 10 or 25 percentage points on selected U.S. products.

The United States believes that Canada’s retaliatory tariffs are inconsistent with World Trade Organization (WTO) rules and has opposed them at the WTO.

See Official Notification from Canada: https://www.fin.gc.ca/access/tt-it/cacsap-cmpcaa-1-eng.asp

China

On April 2, 2018, China began imposing additional tariffs of 15 or 25 percentage points on selected U.S. products.

The United States believes that China’s retaliatory tariffs are inconsistent with WTO rules and has opposed them at the WTO.

See Official Announcement from China (in Mandarin): http://gss.mof.gov.cn/zhengwuxinxi/zhengcefabu/201804/t20180401_2857769.html

China’s notification to the WTO, which includes a list of tariff codes covered by its retaliatory measures in English, is available here.

European Union

On June 22, 2018, the European Union (EU) began imposing additional tariffs of 25 percentage points on selected U.S. products.

The EU has also announced that it reserves the right to impose additional retaliatory tariffs in three years, beginning in 2021, or earlier if the EU receives a favorable ruling by the WTO Dispute Settlement Body on their claim that the U.S. tariffs constitute a violation of WTO rules.

The United States believes the EU tariffs are inconsistent with WTO rules and has opposed them at the WTO.

See Official Announcement from the European Union: https://eur-lex.europa.eu/legal-content/EN/TXT/PDF/?uri=CELEX:32018R0724&from=

EU’s notification to the WTO, which includes a list of tariff codes covered by its retaliatory measures, is available here.

India

India has announced that, effective August 4, 2018, it will impose retaliatory tariffs of an additional 10, 15, 20, 25, or 50 percentage points on selected U.S. products.

India’s notification to the WTO, which includes a list of tariff codes to be covered by its retaliatory measures, is available here.

Japan

Japan has notified the WTO of its intent to impose retaliatory tariffs on U.S. products. To date, however, it has not provided specific information regarding the scope or timing of its retaliatory measures.

Japan’s notifications to the WTO are available here and here.

Mexico

On June 5, 2018, Mexico began imposing additional tariffs ranging from 7 to 25 percentage points on selected U.S. products.

The United States believes that Mexico’s retaliatory tariffs are inconsistent with WTO rules and has opposed them at the WTO.

See Mexico’s Official Notification (in Spanish): http://www.dof.gob.mx/nota_detalle.php?codigo=5525036&fecha=05/06/2018

Russia

On July 6, 2018, Russia announced that they will impose additional tariffs of additional 25, 30, 35, or 40 percentage points on selected U.S. products. The additional tariffs are scheduled to take effect 30 days from the July 6th announcement.

See Russia’s Official Notification (in Russian): http://government.ru/docs/33173/

Russia’s notification to the WTO is available here.

Turkey

On June 21, 2018, Turkey began imposing additional tariffs on selected U.S. products. On August 15, 2018, Turkey announced an increase in the additional tariff rates, ranging from 4 to 140 percent.

The United States believes that Turkey’s retaliatory tariffs are inconsistent with WTO rules and has opposed them at the WTO.

See Turkey’s Official Notifications (in Turkish): http://www.resmigazete.gov.tr/eskiler/2018/06/20180625M1-30.pdf http://www.resmigazete.gov.tr/main.aspx?home=http://www.resmigazete.gov.tr/eskiler/2018/08/20180815.htm&main=http://www.resmigazete.gov.tr/eskiler/2018/08/20180815.htm

Turkey’s notification to the WTO, which includes a list of tariff codes covered by its retaliatory measures in English, is available here.

Additional Information

To the extent retaliatory measures impact agriculture exports, please consult the U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Global Agriculture Information Network (GAIN) reports at https://gain.fas.usda.gov/Lists/Advanced%20Search/AllItems.aspx.

Norway and Switzerland have also requested consultations with the United States, as part of WTO dispute settlement proceedings, on the U.S. Section 232 tariffs on imports of steel and aluminum into the United States. To date, these countries have not announced their intent to impose retaliatory tariffs.

Disclaimer:

The information set forth above regarding foreign retaliatory measures, including the Retaliation Product Coverage Matrix, has been provided as a public service for general reference. Every effort has been made to ensure that the information presented is complete and accurate as of September 18, 2018. The information will be updated as new developments occur.

The actual tariff classification and assessment of duties is determined by customs authorities in the relevant foreign country. Moreover, countries may elect to increase tariffs or otherwise amend tariff treatment at any time. For definitive guidance, parties should contact the government customs agency in the appropriate foreign country.